Episode 29

Getting your business found by Google with Kate Toon

Kate Toon is “the Beyonce of SEO” and knows all the secrets for getting Google to love your website.

She has also built an incredible business and shares her secrets for how her business has grown and the lessons she’s learned along the way

 

In this Episode:

  • 01.25: What is SEO?
  • 02.52: Top tips for getting your website found on Google
  • 09.38: How to outsource your SEO and find the right company
  • 18.43: Building a loyal following
  • 21.18: How Kate built a well-known business
  • 26.04: Kate’s business challenges
  • 35.350: Kate’s business inspirations

 

Links

 

Kate’s Bio

Kate Toon is a writing entrepreneur, as well as a popular coach, speaker, author and podcaster. She’s also a mad good hula hooper.

Her digital education businesses The Recipe for SEO Success and The Clever Copywriting School have helped more than 8000 small business owners grapple the Google beast and write better content.

Kate runs Australia’s only dedicated annual copywriting conference COPYCON.She presents at events around the world and runs several hugely successful Facebook groups.

Author of the popular business self-help book Confessions of a Misfit Entrepreneur: How to succeed in business despite yourself, Kate lives on the Central Coast of Sydney, where she loves wandering on the beach with her son and her CFO (Chief Furry Office-dog) Pomplemousse.

 

Transcription

CLARE:

Kate Toon is a speaker, author, podcaster and the founder of The Recipe for SEO Success e-course. Today we chat all about how to get your business found on Google, and Kate’s shares her biggest learnings from her business journey. There is so much valuable content in this episode, I’m sure you are going to love it.

 

You’re listening to the Clare Wood podcast, where we talk all things business, finance, marketing, and mindset for entrepreneurs, sharing practical tips, and actionable advice to help you take your business to the next level. Introducing your host: me! I’m Clare Wood, I’m a numbers geek, a travel lover, and a reality tv addict, and I’m here to empower you to create an extraordinary business and an amazing life, because I believe you don’t have to choose between the two. Now let’s dive right in to today’s episode.

 

Welcome to the podcast Kate Toon. It’s so good to have you here, thank you for joining us.

 

KATE:

It’s so good to be here.

 

CLARE:

Now, Kate the reason I wanted to bring you on, the main reason is I wanted to know about SEO, as well as you business journey. For anyone who is listening who doesn’t know what SEO is, can you do a quick intro about what it is?

 

What is SEO?

 

KATE:

SEO is the acronym which stands for Search Engine Optimisation which is basically trying to make google, which has a 95% market share in Australia and 80% world-wide, trying to make google fall in love with your website so that when someone is typing in a keyword, it makes google go yep, this is the site I have to put in position one. SEO is like google having a long checklist and you just go through and make sure you check every box. Some of it is about on your own website, probably things you know, does it load quickly does it look good on a mobile, is it easy to get to every page, obvious stuff. But some of it is about what you do on other people’s pages, like building your profile, and getting other sites to look at you. So it’s practical tips to help google fall in love with you and your brand and your website.

 

CLARE:

That’s a really great synopsis.

 

I’ve done your course, The Recipe for SEO Success, and there is so much more to SEO than meets the eye. If someone is just getting started and don’t know where to begin, what are your tips for them to get their website optimised and found on google?

 

Top tips for getting your website found on Google

 

KATE:

I think the first tip is a mindset thing, basically understand there is a lot to it but most of it is common sense, it’s not juju, you don’t have to be a technical wiz kid, 95% of what google is asking from you there are 4 tactics, which I’m going to give to you and you’ll be like, oh ok, they aren’t crazy. Some people feel they are technically illiterate, anything involves pushing a button is beyond them, and it’s like, no, it’s not! Yes it may take longer, than a millennial tech kid, but anyone can do it, you can get there. So that’s mu tactic number 1, sort your mindset out. If you go into it thinking it’s technically and too hard, you are never going to win.

 

My first practical tip, and it sounds like a boring marketing thing is to know who your audience are. Understand the words and phrases they are typing into google. The example I use is my husband’s business which is VoulezVouloz and he is obsessed with ranking for the phrase French lessons Sydney. That’s all people are typing in, but when you see what people are actually typing in, you see so many different phrases, like French tutor, French teacher, learning French, French teach for the kids, French tutorial, there isn’t one phrase, and maybe people don’t type in the literally thing they want, they type in a question, so you have to expand your mind and understand what people are typing into google. We might think we know it, but when you ask, how would you find a business like mine, the things they write you might think, I never would have thought to include that in my copy. An extension from that is to ask your audience. So on your contact form have that little drop down that says ‘where did you find me?’ and if they select google, ask, ‘what keyword did you type into google?’ Because they only just did it a second ago, so they will tell you. The other day I had someone write Copywriter for Vets, and I rank because of a weird combo of words I used for a random blog post, not because I have a page about copywriting for vets. But now I know that someone has written that in, I could create a bespoke page that spoke to vets about their problems and challenges and pain points, and not only land them on it, but have a highly converting landing page that went to it. That’s my tip number 3.

 

You’ve got mindset, understanding your audience and asking people.

 

The next techy thing is speed, how quickly does your site load on different devices. There is a great tool called Pingdom, which you may be able to put in the show notes. That is a tool that will give you a score and tell you “your site will load in 3.5seconds” etc and it will give you a mark. Ideally you want it to be under 5 seconds, even 3 seconds, because the slightest reduction in speed will allow your ranking to go up in google. So when you do that test, you might not 100% understand the results, but there are some resources I have which can help you with that. At least though you can understand if your site is taking 4.5 MINUTES to load, you have a problem and then working on how to fix that problem is the next step. So working on speed is my tip number 4.

 

Tip number 5 would probably be how your site looks like on a mobile because many of us would be using a WordPress, Squarespace or Shopify site and we can think we have brought a responsive design or theme, and yes they respond, they change to the mobile size, but that doesn’t mean the user experience is great. When was the last time you went through to your home page, through to a sales page or contact from on your phone. Does it work? Are the buttons too small for your fat fingers? Do you accidently touch the wrong button because they are too closer together? Is the text visible? Have you got images that aren’t working because they are so small on the detail? Maybe you need to turn that image off for mobile. Do you have pop ups that are interfering with that journey? Really don’t just take the responsiveness for granted. Use your site on your phone. Get others to use your site in front of you, it’s something I do in my workshops, I get people to put their websites on their phone and then hand it to their friend. Then watch how they struggle, where they go, where their eye is drawn. Often when you take a website from desktop to mobile, everything moves around and you might have your icons in a certain order and on mobile they might go out of order and suddenly your have step 2 before step 1, because it hasn’t been coded very well. It’s really important because we have to remember that Google is mobile first now, so it doesn’t even look at your desktop site, it doesn’t care, it only looks at your mobile version. And these days it’s increasing, I know with my site, probably about 60-70% of visitors are viewing from a mobile or tablet, so desktop is on the decline. We can’t just focus on desktop, and most of us design our website on a desktop, so we can’t just assume everything is great and then you suddenly, 8 weeks later, realise that the contact button doesn’t work on the mobile, and you wonder why you haven’t had any enquiries.

 

CLARE:

Great hacks! Even though you have made that sound really simple, for some people the whole concept of getting started on their SEO journey can be really daunting, so a lot of people outsource this, so I would love to know, if someone does want to outsource their SEO,  what are some things they should avoid when finding an SEO company? And what are the things they should look for and how do they know if someone is legit?

 

How to outsource your SEO and find the right company

 

KATE:

Such a good question! And a little plug here, I do have a little SEO course called Little Nibbles (not nipples) which basically is to lead you to a point where you can decide whether you want to do it yourself or outsource, but it has a list of questions to ask. The main things are, you shouldn’t approach someone who has approached you first. If you’ve have had an email from Sanjep saying Greeting’s of the day, I guarantee number one rankings – delete that email. Also delete the email that says, I’ve just looked at your site and found all these things wrong with it. Delete it. I get those emails. They are just scare tactics and they haven’t looked at your site, they are trying to frighten you into action. The other thing is don’t go into a Facebook Group and say, who is a great SEO person? Because you don’t know anyone who is recommending them, and what their affiliation is. Someone might recommend their cousin Gareth, because Gareth does SEO, and he might be a nice chap, but he might not know anything about SEO. You wouldn’t take a recommendation from Maureen for a brain surgeon from Like-Minded B***hes Drinking Wine [Facebook group] but you take a recommendation for someone to mess with your website, which your most important business asset.. crazy! Do your research and get recommendations from people you trust, from mentors, from peers, look at their reviews and then when you speak to them, do they make you feel stupid, do they speak to you in acronyms, are they secretive about their methods, do they talk about having a magic system (because there is no magic system), do they talk about ranking because if they talk about getting you to the number one spot, that is pretty irrelevant to be honest. Ranking is great yes, you want to be in top spot for every word, but what’s more important than ranking? Traffic, relevant traffic and conversions. You should be going to an SEO agency not saying I want to rank number 1 for purple hippos, but I want to get 50% more traffic, improve my conversion rate from 1-5% and I want to make this much more money a month, how are you going to do it. How they do that isn’t your problem. It could be a combination of your ranking, backlinks, it could be many different things, but you give them the end result, you don’t tell them how to do their job. Does that make sense?

 

CLARE:

It does. On that note about backlinks from doing your course, I know there are also agencies that do that in a dodgy way, and by dodgy if you can explain what that means, and also how do you know the agency that you are working with is doing the right way or wrong way?

 

KATE:

Look, with anything there are quick fixes that will get immediate results and push your site up, but a lot of those things, those quick easy fixes, Google doesn’t approve of. So, when google discovers you’ve done these things, it’s a process of google getting around to crawling your site and you get a great result, but then suddenly you’ve dropped out of the rankings, because you’ve hired someone in India you now can’t get hold of, through Fiverr because you didn’t want to pay decent money, your doomed and you have to fix what they have broken. It’s called a Black Cat SEO. People will build links from all manner of sites, because links to a website are a signal to google that that website is worth looks at, like Clare Wood has linked Kate Toon, and Clare Wood’s sites pretty decent so we’ll assume Kate Toon’s is because why would she have linked to her if not. But the thing is, it’s about quality not quantity, so a link from my mum’s blog about hamsters is going to be worth slightly less than a link from the Sydney Morning Herald. I want more Sydney Morning Herald than a link from a Russian porn website, which at first glance, might pass some good authority to my site, but it isn’t relevant and dodgy so I don’t want that. But that’s what Black Cat SEO companies do, they go around and build as many links as they can from irrelevant sites and for a little while that gives you a boost, but then google discovers them and that makes a negative impact and you can actually get a penalty from google and be taken off google, you wouldn’t show up at all, which is insane. And if you aren’t on google you aren’t on the internet. Or you could get a manual penalty and have to go through and get rid of irrelevant links and beg Google to lift the penalty. It’s pretty dangerous and the only way you know if people are doing that is to know a little bit. What I mean by that is you might think this is overwhelming and technical and whatever, but I have an accountant and zero interest in tax law but at least I know what BAS and GST are, what my ROI and Income, Revenue and Expenses are, I can use XERO and reconcile, I know a bit, so if I saw for a while that my BAS hadn’t been done, I would think, why hasn’t my BAS been don’t each quarter? I know a little bit. You can’t get away with putting your head in the sand like an emu, you have to learn a little bit, you don’t have to be pro, but you need to be able to ask the right questions.

 

CLARE:

Do you think it’s a red flag if someone’s SEO service seems too cheap?

 

KATE:

Absolutely, to give you some Australian idea of rates, if I was doing SEO I would be charging about $300-$500 an hour and the price will vary depending on your niche. Plumbers and tradies, super hard to rank, because there is so much competition so you are going to pay a lot more as a tradie than you are as a relationship coach, as it’s not as competitive. But if you think of your average copywriter, graphic designer, I do a lot of survey’s on rates, I just did one for copywriters, for a brand newbie and just learnt about SEO, it is $80-$100 an hour, mid-range rates $100-$160, top level rates $160 +, sky is the limit. If you are getting a quote for $1,000 a month that’s 6 hours. What could you do a month in 6 hours, how many blog posts could you write, how many relationships could you build to get other websites to create backlinks, how many times could you test stuff, change graphics, optimise, check it on mobile etc? I couldn’t do much in 6 hours. The thing that worries me is the overseas people they have no reputation to protect and there is no comeback. And also, the people who post in Facebook groups and say yes, I can help with SEO, and people say Sue is lovely, Sue is great, and then I look at Sue’s own website and she doesn’t have the most basic SEO in there. But I can’t call her out, because I would be beaten up, so I see people fall into the trap of cheap and a pretty website or Instagram. Sometimes you need the boring person in the grey suit who doesn’t have the pretty feed, but who knows what they are talking about. That can sound super disparaging, of course there are people with beautiful Instagram feeds who know about SEO, I’m one of them, my feed is semi ugly but I’m getting there. If it seems too good to be true, 99% of the time it is.

 

CLARE:

And if anyone does want to learn more about SEO, check out Kate Toon’s course. I’ll put a link in the show notes for today’s episode.

 

I’d love to take a sideways leap if we can, I’d love to learn about your business journey, because you have grown an amazing and very loyal following and you’ve grown an amazing business, so I’d love to learn how that has come about? What advice for someone who is looking to grow a loyal following and they are in the early stages of business?

 

Kate’s advice for building a loyal following

 

KATE:

You have to be authentic with yourself, I know that is cheesy, but don’t look at what everyone else is doing. Know what your strengths are and what your personality is, because your brand values will pretty much be your personal values. I was talking about this in my group today, I admire honesty, creativity, generosity and perseverance, and they come out in everything I do. I’m consistent in everything I do. I’m not different on Instagram to Twitter to

in person, people meet me and say oh, you are same as you are online. We laughed at the start of this podcast about Clare’s podcast voice – don’t have a podcast voice, just talk like you, be you. Then what you find is yes, you may not get as many people to follow you, and it’s so easy to be vanilla, especially on Instagram I find is a great spot for that, everyone is doing the same thing, everyone is looking at what others are doing and replicating it. It’s brave to be different and to be odd, and yes you won’t get as many people following you but it’s not a popularity contest. Yes, I have loyal followers, but there isn’t that many of them. I’d rather have one customer that is an advocate of my work and buys from me again and again, because they know, like and trust me, than trying to get hoards of people in by randomly posting hashtags on Instagram that have nothing to do with my business. It’s less is more. Showing up, being consistent and being your flawed self and being odd. Being odd has helped me in my business having a weird sense of humour, and talking about weird things.

 

CLARE:

I think it’s just you that people like. I know for me, I definitely stopped following everyone else and started stepping into me a lot more, and I found that was a big turn for me. If you are listening, I think that is a great tip. In terms of getting the numbers and people on your email list and coming to your website, how have you gone about that journey?

 

How Kate built a well-known business

 

KATE:

From the early days I did SEO, I’ve never done paid ads, I’ve done a little bit of re-marketing on Facebook but that’s about it, it’s been a slow burn, I’m 11 years in. Some points where it really lept up, was when I launched a free course, which was then the 10 Day Challenge, which is now the SEO Nibbles. It was high quality, it wasn’t just 3 emails with text in them, it was emails with videos and worksheets, and checklists, it was better than someone’s paid thing and if was free and then I started a Facebook group on the back of that, and that was a big leap. I think I got 1,000 people on a week and that was huge back then.

 

The next big leap was when I started podcasting, as you know you get a lot of followers from that, and it’s an intimate relationship, so people will either love you or hate you, and I would take a bullet for some the people’s podcasts I listen too, I love them, I love the hosts and wait for the next episode.

 

Finally, public speaking, which I know will scare the poo out of a lot of people. I did about 37 events in one year and it was hard and a lot of work, but it massively lifted my profile and opened up other opportunities to speak at other things, because they’d seen or heard about me, so those were the big shifts.

 

CLARE:

If you could go back, right back, and do it all again, what would you do differently?

 

KATE:

I’d love to say nothing, but my biggest regret in business was reacting to people. Reacting to criticism, to trolls, to competitors, to copy cats, because all of it distracts you from what you are doing, and it takes an emotional toll to deal with it and work through it, and it wastes time. The hours I’ve wasted when I’ve found someone who has copied me, and then I’ve gone down the rabbit hole and then found others that have copied me. Or the hours I’ve felt low and looked at what competitors are doing and it’s not research, it’s torturing yourself, it doesn’t help, it doesn’t motivate you, it just makes you feel insecure, like an imposter. I used to have a sticker on my computer that said “Don’t React!”. So when someone has told me someone has copied me, I don’t even look. Or if a competitor has launched a new thing, I don’t want to know. If someone trolls me, I screen grab it and share it on social media and make fun of them. But I don’t let my emotions come into play at all. I’m a zen cow of calm. So I wish I hadn’t wasted so much time on that.

 

CLARE:

It’s the emotional energy, it’s really draining, it’s a waste. Something that I’ve done, if you are ever feeling in that space, write the email or post and don’t push send.

 

KATE:

Do it in Word though so you don’t accidently send it!

 

The other thing I would say is, if you aren’t going to let the lows and negativity affect you, you can’t let the highs affect you either. So when you get a compliment and things are going well, you can’t sit there going “mmm, I’m awesome”, you have to ignore that, acknowledge it and thank them but don’t let it get to you because if you can be brought up you can be brought down, and in business, I’m a very emotional person, I’m empathetic to the ridiculousness, so if I let myself go on that rollercoaster, I would be up and down all day like a loony, so I have to try and keep myself somewhere in the centre, otherwise I’d go mad.

 

CLARE:

Great tips!

What has been the toughest time you have gone through in business?

Kate’s business challenges

 

KATE:

When I was trying to move out of being a service provider and exchanging my time for money and moving into having multiple income streams and passive income, so I was still trying to service clients, at the top of my copywriting game so I had big clients and agencies, and I was trying to build The Recipe for SEO Course course at the same time. And NBN didn’t exist. I’d have to put my video on a USB and courier it to my make who did, because I could not get the videos to upload to Vimeo. How I did my course was, I sold it, then I built it week by week, so the day before module 4 was about to come out, I was creating module 4 at 2am in the morning. So that was stressful. And I took an income hit because I was dedicating time to that, and I had a 5 year old, and I got pretty chubby at that time, and bad habits of too much coffee and wine. I’m reaping the rewards now, but I wish I’d been more patient and taken longer to do it, because I would have still done it, I just wouldn’t have run myself ragged in the process.

 

CLARE:

Did you ever consider giving up?

 

KATE:

No, because what’s the alternatively, I have to go work for some fat man in a suit.

 

CLARE:

And that’s not exciting!

 

KATE:

No, and they wouldn’t have me now, I’m unemployable. There is no option, I’ve given up on projects and there are things I don’t do anymore, for example I don’t have copywriting clients anymore, so I gave up that and that was hard, it was my identity, working with big brands. I’m very much of the fail fast school of thought. I had this idea to make SEO tea towels, and I went fully down the road of getting them designed, and print quotes, then I was like no one else wants these except me, what am I doing? So I gave that up, and have a few boxes of tea towels in my loft, if you ever need a tea towel.

 

It’s the stupid things that are sometimes the most fun, and also, when I started doing my SEO course, people said that’s stupid, it can’t be taught and look at me now! I’ve never given up though, maybe given up on the day and finished at 1pm because I’m tired, but generally, I persevere and keep turning up and that’s part of my success. I keep showing up.

 

CLARE:

That’s a biggie hey. Everyone goes through the crappy times. Back on the tea towels though…

 

KATE:

You want one! You want one so hard!

 

CLARE:

I’d love one for Christmas! But seriously, both with myself and clients of mine, it’s the distraction factor right. I’ll be working towards something and then I’m like, I’m going to write a book, and he’s like, OMG. I can see it in other people, but when it’s myself, it feels like totally the right thing to do. Of course I’m going to write a book, on top of my two young children and my clients, and my course and my podcast, it’s a perfectly sensible thing to do. How do you stop yourself from getting distracted by all of the things?

 

KATE:

It’s a constant problem and delight. Whenever I have an idea I’m very practical, I put it into Asana, and it becomes something that is going to happen, but just maybe not happen now. I’m much better at taking a longer view and I’ve got goals towards that, I’m relaunching my podcast, I’m launching a mastermind for copywriters, and I want to write another book, while I still run my course 3 times, have 2 other podcasts and speaking to do around the world, I have two memberships with over 400 people in them, and I only work 20 hours a week, so how the hell do I do all that? I eat that elephant one bite at a time and by the end of the year, I would have ticked off 1-2 things. I’m not going to go by January I need to do this.. I don’t put that pressure on myself. You might not agree with this, a lot of business coaches are around business plans and setting goals, don’t give me a goal, as soon as I have that goal I’ll do everything but achieve it. I set myself a goal 4 years ago to get 5,000 followers on Instagram, and just last week I got 5,000 followers. As soon as I set that goal I no interest in Instagram. Someone telling me what to do, so I don’t do them anymore. I chip away at what my passion is, I’m really excited about my book, and I’m not so excited about re-building the recipe course, even though the recipe course is 60% of my income, hugely financially viable, but I want to dedicate my time to writing a book that I know will only sell 2,000-3,000 copies and not make me any money at all, but that’s what I get excited about. It’s my business, I can be an idiot if I want to be, thank you very much.

 

CLARE:

Do you think it gets any easier as time goes on?

 

KATE:

Yes, a hundred percent. It’s like having kids right, it gets easier but different. In the early stages, you have to stop them dying, you have to feed the, wipe their bums, you have to go out with a bag full of a million things, you are stressed and tired and that’s like the first year of business and why most people give up. You might remember stats better than me, but I think it’s 1 in 3 businesses fail in the first year, that might be restaurants but it’s a great stat, I love a good made up stat. After a while, you don’t worry about carrying the nappy bag, and them dying every 5mins. When I first started I didn’t even think about competitors, I was so focused on making money and what I was doing, then when I started getting successful, I was thinking, who else is successful. What are they doing? Then I started getting a bit more well-known and then the trolls started coming, because when you have 5 people following you the likelihood of one of them being an idiot is small, but when you have 5,000 there’s more idiots. If you are anything like me, you also move the goal posts, because it’s the human condition to be not satisfied, so I’ve achieved this, what is next? It’s hard to go nothing next, just sit in the discomfort of nothing to do, what a horrible thought. Weird people do that. Constantly looking for new things to do, to satisfy that lust that we as humans have, that is the only major problem. Confidence grows, you’ve dealt with issues and had ups and downs, horrible people, financial difficulties, and after a while it doesn’t bother you, but the constant lust and yearning to write that book, or whatever, is the only thing I’m left with.

 

CLARE:

I definitely think the first of anything is always the hardest. Your first breakup is the worst right. Then once you’ve been on that journey it’s all familiar again. I’m obviously not as far into business as you are, but I’ve already found it’s easier in terms of the emotional side of it. It’s still hard, and I’m doing more than even before, but it’s not as emotional as it was in the earlier stages.

 

KATE:

It’s silly and we are laughing, but it’s one of the most important things, particularly to women, I don’t think men are half as emotional. I’m not saying men are terminators without emotion, but they don’t react like we do, we are sensitive and fundamentally want to be liked. And a lot of us have issues around not being enough. But once you get through that you are free to do anything! That’s what my new books about. It’s really cheesy, but that quote, what if you weren’t scared of anything, and money was no object and everyone loved you, what would you do? It’s all true. You can decide it’s true right now and be successful. The emotional thing is huge though and should not be underestimated.

 

Kate’s business inspirations

 

CLARE:

Last question, who has been your biggest inspiration or mentor in business.

 

KATE: I don’t have one. I’ve never had a business coach or been in a mastermind, I’ve only just brought my first course. I don’t get inspiration from people above me, I get inspiration from people around me, so my customers, that’s where I get all my ideas from and they say that’s a terrible idea and I go ok, I won’t do that. I get inspiration from friends, like you, and other people in the business and I find their achievement inspiring. Sometimes I would like a business coach to say this is what you do next, but as I said, if you were my business coach and you said do this, I’d say I won’t, I don’t want to and do the exact opposite, because I’m a fool and I don’t like being told what to do. So I don’t really have one and I’m good with that.

 

CLARE:

Any last things you want to share with the listeners? Or what’s coming up next with Kate Toon.

 

KATE:

I’m going to share one last tip, and it’ something that’s come up in this whole podcast, it is so important to be patient, it gets easier what you do over time, failing first, being patient is so important, we have all the time in the world to do what we want to do, I’m 46.. but we’ve got years, I can’t go back and work for the man, and we’ve got 20-30 years ahead of us to be working, so patience is really important. There’s this real urgency to be hustling and kicking ass and doing the thing, but the world will wait, your customers will wait, and even if your competitor launches the same thing as you, there are enough customers to go around, I’m not into woo woo, but there are enough people, abundance is real. You have to believe that.

 

In terms of what is coming up for me, I have my whole google calendar planned out for the year. I’m speaking in Holland in April and the UK in June, I’ve got other events during the year, I’ve got a mastermind group and book coming and I’m doing all the things, and keeping all the existing plates spinning and keeping everything ticking along. So that’s enough.

 

CLARE:

So inspiring, I have no idea how you do it all. Thank you so much for joining us today and sharing some of your wisdom and your business journey. All of Kate’s details will be in the show notes for today’s episode at clarewood.com.au/podcast/episode29. Thank you Kate.

 

KATE:

Thanks so much!

 

CLARE:

Thank you so much for joining me today, if you enjoyed this episode, please make sure you subscribe to receive future episodes, and I’d be so grateful for a review on apple podcast! If you’d like a copy of the show notes or any of the links mentioned today, please jump over to clarewood.com.au/podcast and remember that Clare is spelled CLARE, have a wonderful week and look forward to chatting to you again soon!

 

 

About your host

Hi, I’m Clare Wood – I’m a numbers geek, a travel lover, a reality tv addict, and a passionate business coach. I’m here to empower you to create an extraordinary business and an amazing life; because I believe you don’t have to choose between the two.

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